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March 11, 2014 Schedule

March 11, 2014 A104
Schedule of Events
9 to 2 TEDx Talks
12:45 to 1:45 Lunch
3 to 5 Facing History Workshop

What is TEDx? TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” The program is designed to give communities, organizations and individuals the opportunity to stimulate dialogue through TED-like experiences at the local level. At TEDx events, a screening of TED Talks videos — or a combination of live presenters and TED Talks videos — sparks deep conversation and connections. TEDx events are fully planned and coordinated independently, on a community-by-community basis.

Talk Times: Session I: Educator and Education in the 21st Century

9 to 9:15 Bonnie MacDougall
Bonnie MacDougall has taught English in all sorts of forms—Composition, ESL, and literature including Shakespeare and Mythology and Literature—for more than thirty years, beginning at Queens College, CUNY, and now for twenty-six years at Bergen Community College. Her training was at Columbia University where she received a Ph.D. in Sixteenth Century English Literature where she studied with William Nelson and James Mirollo in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Her dissertation was on the permutations of the Pygmalion myth from 3 B.C. to its displaced use in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale. In the 1980s she worked on the English versions of translations of Sunil Gangopadhyay’s poems in City of Memories, with Kalyan Ray, preface by Allen Ginsberg. In 2004-05, she directed a New Jersey ELMS grant which resulted in the production of EDRE, an online repository of resources for the Department of English faculty. In 2011-2012, she served as Interim Academic Vice President and fostered inter-disciplinary programs such as the Science Literacy Project and is now back in the classroom, which she has never enjoyed more. In her TEDx talk, Bonnie MacDougall charts the evolution of her presence in the classroom from a persona to a person, finding remarkable parallels in her experiences and views with those of Parker J. Palmer as expressed in The Courage to Teach.

9:15 to 9:30 Sony Tiwari
Sony Tiwari enjoys a varied career in the arts as an instructor, composer, producer, conductor, researcher, and performer. He is the co-founder of Realativity Music Group, a production company that works closely with up-and-coming artists to develop musical repertoire and hone performance skills. Serving as Chief In-House Producer, Sony has been able to work in a wide array of music styles while simultaneously composing works for multimedia and the concert hall. As an M.A. graduate in Music Education at NYU Steinhardt, Sony focused his research efforts in India during two separate visits, the first resulting in “Music and Innovation in the World Class Indian University.” The second trip led to his thesis, “Oral Tradition and Musical Knowledge in Indian Composition Pedagogy,” recognized by NYU Steinhardt with the Outstanding Master’s Thesis Research award. Continuing to explore his research interests in music education and teaching at the college, Sony currently heads courses in music theory, the humanities and music business.

Sony’s TEDx Talk: Understanding Teacher Feedback: Am I the Greatest Worst Professor Ever? Teacher feedback and evaluations in the United States have been around since at least the 1920’s, coming into prominence during the educational reforms of the 1960s. Originally, the move to evaluate teachers was reactionary; a response to the demands of students to let their voices be heard. Today, with an increased emphasis on assessment and accountability in education, student evaluations and feedback have been afforded a larger role. Given recent technological innovations and their effect on social relationships, how does the role of student evaluations mirror the changing relationship between teachers and students? As stakeholders are allowed greater access to every part of the educational process, what challenges and opportunities are teachers confronted with? How does a young teacher cope with the widening range of opinion on their craft: from the glowing class observation of their Dean to the latest scathing online review? Using humorous personal anecdotes and novel comparisons to unrelated fields, Prof. Sony Tiwari will discuss the impact of technology on the teacher-student relationship.

9:30 to 9:45 Joseph Ginese

Joseph’s TEDx Talk: Education is missing the mark on critical thinking (reflection), confidence (value), and perspective (awareness). We need more than passionate subject matter experts in our classrooms. We need people trained and aware of the teaching techniques that engage and empower each and every generation of learners coming into the classroom.

9:45 to 10 Cynthia Chambless


Cynthia C. Chambless, Ed. D. has established a career in education. She taught English, alternative and non-alternative, on the secondary level. She, also, was a junior high school assistant principal and a district English curriculum coordinator (7-12). All in comprehensive, multicultural school districts. Dr. Chambless holds a BA in English, St. Thomas Aquinas College; a MA in Reading, Long Island University; an Advanced Degree in Education and Administration, SUNY at New Paltz; and an Ed. D. in Leadership, Policy and Management, Seton Hall University. She is a recipient of the Education of Excellence Award from the New York State English Council, 2007. She has acquired a 3rd Degree Black Belt. Currently, Dr. Chambless is a lecturer Professor. Cynthia’s TEDx Talk: The Education Gap: Acquiring but not Achieving There is an education gap that must be closed. This gap occurs when students attain a seat to be educated, but do not graduate. Dr. Chambless’ presentation will focus on this gap with respect to three areas: the issue (not writing well), the causes of the issue (a historical perspective), and solutions to the issue. Additionally, two major questions will be posed: Are we cognizant that a radical change has occurred in how students learn in the 21st century? And. too, are we cognizant that educating our 21st century learner must include the involvement of technology?

10 to 10:15 Lori Talarico


Lori Talarico is an Associate Professor at Bergen Community College, a member of the Department of English, and Coordinator of Bergen’s first-year experience course, Success 101. She is the recipient of the 2013 National On Course Award for her development of the Success Course. Lori’s circuitous journey led her to finally get an education at the age of thirty at Bergen Community College, where she then won a scholarship to Columbia University. You can hear her life lessons in her first TED talk. Once on the other side of the desk, Lori connected with the struggles reflected in the stories of her students—not believing in themselves and lacking motivation, weak to non-existent emotional and financial support, and an inability to believe that they can actually make it in college. In this talk she’ll share ideas on how to motivate and guide students so that, upon graduation, they leave knowing as much about who they are, what they believe in and what their purpose in life is, as they do about their field of study. Her motto: Engage the heart and the head. 10:15 to 10:30 Break

Session II: The Future of Education

10:30 to 10:45 Elizabeth Gallagher Kendrik I

n November 2011, Elizabeth became Project Manager and NASA Principal Investigator for the Space Frontier Foundation’s Teachers in Space project: http://www.teachersinspace.org. The Foundation will train and fly 1000 teachers suborbitally and return them safely to their classrooms to inspire their students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. 
In 2008 she opened the New York Chapter of Space Tourism Society (STS) and began working with Space Frontier Foundation (SFF) to co-sponsor and produce events such as Yuri’s Night NY and TEDxMidTownNY. TimeOut New York featured Yuri’s Night: www3.timeoutny.com/newyork/
tonyblog/2009/04/hot-recap-yuris-night-nyc-at-galapagos-art-space/. This event is part of an annual worldwide celebration of humanity’s achievements and future in space, featuring speakers, fashion shows, live music, DJs, dancing, costumes, and choreographed light sabre battles!

10:45 to 11 Mark Travis Rivera

Mark Travis Rivera is an award-winning LGBTQA activist, choreographer, and published writer who devotes his talents to bringing awareness to social issues. Mark lives in New Jersey and attends William Paterson University, where he majors in women’s & gender studies with a minor in journalism and public relations. He is the 2013 recipient of the Voice & Action Student Leadership Award by Campus Pride, Mark has dedicated himself to educating, empowering, and supporting his fellow LGBTQ community members through his advocacy efforts. You can learn more about Mark by visiting his website at http://www.MarkTravisRivera.com

Talk Title: Embracing Yourself, Embracing Your Potential  Embracing Yourself, Embracing Your Potential aspires to inspire others to learn to embrace every aspect of their identity. We are all made up of many identities and sometimes the intersections of those identities make it difficult to embrace all of whom we are. The complexity that stems from those intersectional identities are magnified by the lack of appropriate and realistic media representation of who we are—especially for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community and people of color. The key to unlocking your potential is found in your ability to embrace yourself, your imperfections, and in your ability to share your story. Your life matters. You are important enough, special enough, and most importantly you are worthy enough of being seen and heard for who you are. Now it’s time to begin to learn how to embrace yourself so you can embrace your potential.

11:00 to 11:15 Elif Karacayir

BIO: In 2011, Elif Karacayir packed her bags, kissed her family and friends goodbye, and got on a plane from Istanbul to New York City, just weeks before turning eighteen. Currently, Elif is finishing her second year at Bergen Community College. She plans to transfer to a top-tier school right after going to Africa for the summer to pursue humanitarian work; she has had a passion for volunteering since she was sixteen. As a student of many cultures, traveling the world is one of her greatest aspirations; she has been to seven countries and doesn’t plan on stopping there. During her trips overseas, she’s relished the exciting taste of discovering new cultures and hearing other languages. Most potently, she’s always been interested in the differences between cultures and the knowledge one could gain by experiencing them directly, which ultimately inspired her decision to move to America. While always trying to improve her communication skills in English, she is also beginning to learn French. Elif describes her studying abroad experience as challenging, but gratifying- she looks forward to waking up every single day, knowing that a new, thrilling, character-building challenge awaits her, one she will have never seen coming. Her biggest motivation in this brave, new world is undoubtedly having a large circle of colleagues around, and her goal is to keep her community open, welcoming, and always curious to learn more.

Butterfly Effect: Spreading Peace through Education Elif, in her talk, speaks of her adventures in searching for peace. From her beginnings in Istanbul, she travels the world, finding shape and character in experiences across many different countries. She ultimately settles in the United States, where she currently attends college. During her study-abroad experience, she encounters fellows who exacerbate her self-growth; facing the incredible challenges of breaking out of her comfort zone and finding the confidence to thrive in a strange, new country, she learns to not only welcome others into her life, but to help them, as well. Through this, she learns the truth of education- it’s much more than finding some steady job and realizing the American dream. It’s an environment where everyone stands strongly united, regardless of his or her skin color, nationality, religion, or gender. She also speaks of the turning point, the Socratic moment when she realizes how much she truly doesn’t know. She learns to learn from others simply by listening, being an audience to their unique stories and origins; the more she listens, the more she finds peace, and the clearer peace becomes. Reminiscing on these encounters that continue to nurture her along her never-ending journey, Elif hopes to see the day that her story will impact others and inspire them, just as others have inspired her, to nourish the butterfly effect and carry it with them as they discover the majesty of the modern world, and search for peace in the hearts of other people.

11:15 to 11:30 John Runkles, Founder of Bulb

BIO: John Runkles is the president of Bulb Inc., an education technology company based in Fort Collins, Colorado. In his role at bulb, he is helping to define what the next generation of electronic learning tools will look like. John is passionate about human-centered software design and reforming the world of electronic learning.

John’s TEDx Talk: For many of us, the web is to learning what fast food is to cuisine: quick, cheap, and fattening. Massive quantities of low-quality information floods the modern student’s day, displacing genuine, original thought. The effective education technology of the future will slow down the student and make space for deep, original, creative thought.

11:30 to 11:45 Rich Valdes

In an age where all things seem to be digital we can all afford to practice and improve on our communication skills to make us more confident, and competent, as we network and build connections. Rich Valdes—a father of two from Bergen County— is a leadership and communications strategist with experience in entrepreneurship, government, and education. He was Director of Admissions and Marketing at Somerset Christian College, a founder of the BelovED Community Charter School, and appointed to the NJ Governor’s Administration to help connect families, communities, and educators. Rich is also a regularly featured television / keynote speaker and a columnist for The Washington Times.

11:45 to 12:00 Break

Session III: Sustainability and Education

12:00 to 12:15 Peter Hauenstein

Peter Hauenstein is a recently graduated student with an undergraduate degree in biology from Ramapo College. Several years ago he studied abroad in the Turks and Caicos Islands with the School for Field Studies and it changed his life. This experience spurred him to travel to Grenada to assist the Ocean Spirits conservation group with leatherback sea turtle nesting research. More recently he has participated in research with Rutgers University in the Cayman Islands. Upon his return from Turks and Caicos, he began to give lectures and presentations to local schools and colleges including Bergen Community College and Ramapo College.

Peter’s TEDx Talk: Caribbean Marine Conservation: 21st Century Education in a Sea of Change Peter will speak about ocean conservation education specifically in the Caribbean with applications to the rest of the world’s oceans, and will stress the wonderful opportunity that exists in using the ocean as a classroom. In the past this type of education was lacking; presently the field of marine biology is growing steadily and the future provides the opportunity to expand even more on this.

12:15 to 12:30 Eric Fuchs-Stengel

Eric is the Executive Director and Founder of the Mahwah Environmental Volunteers Organization, Inc. (MEVO) an environmental 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization based in Northern, New Jersey, which he started in 2008 when he was sixteen years old. MEVO carries out environmental sustainability volunteer projects ranging from trash clean-ups and hiking trail building to teaching educational programs on beekeeping and managing organic farms. Since its founding MEVO has mobilized over 1,500 volunteers to carry out over 20,000 hours of volunteer work. Some projects the organization is currently involved with are: Removing and stopping illegal trash dumping on Stag Hill in Mahwah, New Jersey in partnership with the Ramapough Lunaape Nation. Building a one-acre educational organic farm at Saddle River County Park in Fairlawn, New Jersey in partnership with the Bergen County Parks Department. He is currently a senior at New York University Gallatin School of Individualized Study majoring in Ecological Sustainability and Social Change with a minor in Environmental Studies. He is the receiver of the 2012 Russell Berrie Award for Making a Difference. He was also just awarded the Governors’ Environmental Excellence Award as the state of New Jersey 2013 Environmentalist of the Year along with many other honors.

Experiential action based environmental education and its impact Environmentalism is often considered a social movement, which is rarely taught within public schools in the Northern, New Jersey region. While this lack of education persists global environmental problems such as climate change, biodiversity loss, rainforest deforestation, and synthetic chemical build up in humans and animals is increasing exponentially. MEVO (Mahwah Environmental Volunteers Organization, Inc.) is one of the few environmental organizations working within Northern, NJ to teach the important ideals of environmental sustainability to high school and college students through hands on action to address environmental problems. Organizing large scale illegal trash dump removals, building hiking trails, teaching children about the importance of beekeeping and organic agriculture, and operating horticultural therapy programs are just some of the many things MEVO’s student leaders are involved in. This hands on action-based learning has changed our student leader’s career paths, impacted their values, and been an asset for getting in to colleges such as: Tufts, Fordham, Cornell, New York University, and Princeton. From our programs our student leaders have become passionate sustainability advocates with a local and global understanding of the role of environmentalism within the 21st century.

12:30 to 12:45 Paul Rosolie

 

Paul Rosolie is a naturalist, explorer, author, and award winning wildlife filmmaker. His short film An Unseen World won the UN Forum on Forests 2013 short films award, and has been described as ‘nature filmmaking at its most raw and innovative”. Specializing in tropical rain forests, his work has taken him to place like Borneo, India, Brazil, and Peru. In the Amazon he has traveled with poachers into deep jungle to document the black market trade in endangered species, researched giant anacondas, raised an orphaned giant anteater by hand, and explored a previously undocumented ecosystem that has come to be called the ‘floating forest’. He spends extended periods in solitude, paddling his raft in remote corners of the jungle, filming, writing, and observing wildlife. His book Mother of God (Harper Collins) has gained the praise of environmentalists and adventurers such as Jane Goodall, Bear Grylls, and Bill McKibben who have called the book a “gripping”, “awe inspiring”, “rousing tale”, “with a great and enduring point”.

Paul’s TEDx Talk: Shifting Baselines: Ecosystems, Technology, and the Most Important Lesson We Never Learned (and are not Teaching) Synopsis: We all know that the natural world is changing fast. For example, the number of harvestable fish in the oceans one hundred years ago is vastly greater than the number existing today. The story is similar for species and ecosystems all over the globe. Yet traditionally we have struggled to grasp this declining state of nature throughout the years. Each generation judges environmental decline based on the world they observe, and so with each generation our reference points change. Scientists call this phenomenon “shifting baselines” or “inter-generational amnesia”, and new attention to this problem is causing scientists to re-evaluate what is needed for species and natural systems to return to healthy levels. Needless to say, this baseline on individual species is connected to us and the rest of the web of life, and encompasses the health and wealth of individuals and economies all over the globe. But what does this mean for each of us? Perhaps throughout history the reckless scale of our environmental consumption is partly due to the fact that we as a species were never able to see the whole picture. Yet today all that is changing.

12:45 to 1:45 Lunch

Session IV: Teaching Genocide

1:45 to 2

David Eichenholtz and Thomas LaPointe David Eichenholtz is ccurrently – Co-Director of the Peace, Justice, and Reconciliation Center and the Associate Dean of College/High School Partnerships at Bergen Community College. Formerly Superintendent/Business Administrator/Assistant Principal for the Haworth School District, David has a Doctorate Degree in Education Leadership from St. John’s University.

Thomas La Pointe is an assistant professor of literature and composition and a co-director of the Center for Peace, Justice and Reconciliation at Bergen Community College. He has served as a visiting professor at the Shanghai International Studies University, China, and as a journalist and researcher at the Institute for Central American Studies, Costa Rica. He is a co-editor of the volume Hidden Genocides: Power, Knowledge, Memory (2014).

2 to 2:15 Peter Nelson

Peter Nelson is the Director of the New York Office of Facing History and Ourselves. He joined the Facing History and Ourselves staff in 1993. Facing History and Ourselves is a non-profit that has been working in the field of Holocaust and genocide education for over 35 years. It works with teachers around the world to assist them in pushing their students to think about historical choices and use this understanding to make better choices today themselves. Facing History believes that young people are moral philosophers and can be inspired to agency, that they need to know that they can change the world. Prior to joining Facing History and Ourselves, Peter worked for 13 years as a New York City high school teacher in the public schools starting at Harlem Prep. In that time, he taught math, philosophy, medical ethics, community service, and a variety of other courses. In his last two years, he taught Facing History and Ourselves at Satellite Academy, a New York City alternative public high school that is part of the Coalition of Essential Schools. He received a B.A. in psychology from State University of New York at Binghamton and an M.A. in philosophy from City University of New York.

Peter’s TEDx Talk: The Nature of Genocide Education The talk will speak to the importance of genocide education and the challenges posed by both the system of education we have as well as our own human nature. Our difficulty in imagining that people “like us” could do such heinous acts prevents us from taking seriously the need to be educated in new and more dedicated ways. Until we do, it’s hard to imagine an end to the violence we do to each other, from bullying to genocide.

2:15 to 3:00 Open Forum and Wrap Up

3 to 5 Facing History Workshop

Helpful Hints to Make Your Day Extraordinary!

TEDxBergenCommunityCollege Event Schedule

Helpful Hints to Make Your Day at Bergen Great:

You may use your laptops, tablets and phones to tweet or blog from the event, #TEDxBergenCommunityCollegeED. However, we do ask that you set your phone ring on mute.

There will be short breaks and one longer break throughout the day. Should you need to leave the theatre during a presentation, we ask that you do so in a respectful manner.

The day will be videotaped and there will be a chance that your image may be shown. Any material will be used exclusively in conjunction with TED and TEDx and will not be sold in any way.

This is a GREEN event and accordingly we are refraining from dissemination of paper handouts. If you are interested in learning or hearing more from a speaker, please contact Ellen Feig at efeig@bergen.edu.

Bergen Community College is an active and busy campus and class will be in session. Please stay within the theatre area with the exception of the lunch break

Parking on campus can be tricky as we have 17,000 students. Plan on arriving early and staying with us for the entire day to insure your parking space in lots A and/or B.

We’d love to serve lunch to everyone but are unable to do so. The Student Center has many food options and the cafeteria on the second floor has everything your stomach could imagine.

Staff and student volunteers will be available throughout the day to assist you in any way and to answer any questions you may have.

If you need any special considerations, please let us know before April 26th.

All tickets are “sold out” on Eventbrite

Please note that all of the Eventbrite tickets are “sold out” – if you would like to attend, please contact efeig@bergen.edu.

Great TED Talks

Janine Shepherd: A Broken Body Isn’t a Broken Person

http://on.ted.com/UMBC

What is this?

CollegeCouncilcpjr-logo-smallkey

Bergen Community College is one of only 20 colleges/universities in the world who have received a TEDx license. While TED is best known for its innovative talks, which appear on the web site TED.com, it is much more than an Internet phenomenon. TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to ideas worth spreading. It started out in 1984 as a conference that brought together people from three worlds: technology, entertainment, and design. Since then its scope has become even broader. Along with two annual conferences – the TED Conference in Long Beach and Palm Springs each spring, and the TEDGlobal conference in Edinburgh UK each summer – TED includes the award-winning TEDTalks video site, the Open Translation Project and TEDConversations, the inspiring TEDFellows and TEDx programs, and the annual TED Prize.

The TEDx program gives communities, organizations and individuals the opportunity to stimulate dialogue through TED-like experiences at the local level. TEDx events are planned and coordinated independently. During a TEDx event, three TED videos are shown and live speakers talk for a period of no more than 15 minutes on a subject of their choosing, vetted by the organizer, CPJR, which has determined that the day will revolve around the theme of forgiveness in rather broad terms.

The event, April 26th, 9 to 4 in the Ciccone Theatre, will be free and open to the college community and surrounding areas creating a sense of community and engagement.

Sponsored by:

TEDxBergenCommunityCollege = an independently organized TED event

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